| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Stop wasting time looking for files and revisions. Connect your Gmail, DriveDropbox, and Slack accounts and in less than 2 minutes, Dokkio will automatically organize all your file attachments. Learn more and claim your free account.

View
 

Develop an outcomes logic model

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 5 months ago

Step 5: Develop an outcomes logic model

 

 

Rationale: why develop an outcomes logic model and what it brings to the process

The next part of the workshop involves distilling and integrating the information from the problem trees, vision, identification of outputs and network maps into the outcomes logic model. The outcomes logic model borrows in part from Bennett’s hierarchy (Bennett and Rockwall, 2000; Templeton, 2005). It is based on the premise that a number of actors will need to be doing things differently if the project is to achieve its vision. It is constructed in table format and each row of the table corresponds to an actor and describes the changes in practice, knowledge, attitude and skills (KAS) that are needed to achieve the vision. It also describes the project strategies to achieve these changes. Project strategies include co-developing project outputs (knowledge, technology, etc.) with stakeholders, capacity building, communication, political lobbying, etc.

 

 

 

Table 1. The outcomes logic model1
Actor (or group of actors who are expected to change in the same way)
Change in Practice required to achieve the Project’s Vision
Change in KAS required to support this change
Project strategies2 to bring about these changes in KAS and Practice?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

1 One table is filled out for the four actor groups–-next users, end users, politically-important actors and project implementors
 
2 Project strategies include co-developing project outputs (knowledge, technology, etc.) with stakeholders, capacity building, communication, political lobbying, etc.
 

 

 
The outcomes logic model integrate the different workshop outputs. The development of project outputs are generally the project's most important strategy to bring about changes in practice and KAS. Therefore project outputs are entered in column 4, along with the description of how the project will work with next users and end users to develop the outputs (i.e., the participatory technology development strategies). Strategies to form and strengthen relationships identified from the network maps are also entered in column 4. Changes in actor attitude from the scaling strategy are entered in column 3. The changes in behavior from the vision are entered in column 2. For all changes, the respective actors are entered in column 1.
 

For example, strategies for developing project outputs would be entered in column 4 of the table. Participants then describe what changes in KAS and practice will result from the development and use of project outputs. In contrast, the scaling strategy often identifies changes in stakeholder knowledge or attitude towards what the project is trying to do, and would be entered in column 3 followed by the cells in the other columns.

 

Preparation for the exercise:

 

how long it takes

This exercise would take about an hour-and-a-half.

 

how to set it up

Participants will need the materials they have produced in the workshop: the problem tree, vision, network maps and use these as inputs.

 

 

How to develop an outcome logic model?

The project’s outcome logic model is constructed by filling out the worksheet shown in the table below, based on information contained in the workshop outputs. One worksheet is filled out for each of the four main stakeholder groups-–next users, end users, politically-important actors and project implementors. Different workshop outputs have different starting points in the table. For example, development of the project outputs – identified in the problem tree analysis – requires strategies that would be entered in column 4 in the worksheet. Participants then describe what changes in KAS and practice that will result from the development and use of these products. The scaling strategy(see here for a diagram of the PIPA process), often identifies changes in stakeholder knowledge or attitude towards what the project is trying to do, and would be entered in column 3. Bringing these changes about may involve the development of outputs with those stakeholders, but it may also involve other strategies, such as communication of research findings through face-to-face meetings and medium such as radio programs, policy briefs, journal articles, etc.

 

Filling out the table starting with project outputs

 

Actor (or group of actors who are expected to change in the same way)
Change in Practice required to achieve the Project’s Vision
Change in KAS required to support this change
Project strategies2 to bring about these changes in KAS and Practice?
Step 2. Write the name of the next users of output.
 
Step 3. Describe what the actor will be doing differently when they use the output.
Step 4. Describe the KAS changes that an actor will need to use the output
Step 1. Write the output
 
Step 5: Describe the project strategies to achieve the changes in KAS and the initial adoption of the output by the actor

 

Filling out the table starting with scaling strategy (changes in attitude)

Actor (or group of actors who are expected to change in the same way)
Change in Practice required to achieve the Project’s Vision
Change in KAS required to support this change
Project strategies2 to bring about these changes in KAS and Practice?
Step 1. Write the name of the actors
Step 3. Describe what they would be doing differently when they have this change in attitude
Step 2. Describe the change in attitude
Step 4. Describe the project strategies.

 

 

Filling out the table starting with scaling strategy (forming or strengthening relationships)
 

 

Actor (or group of actors who are expected to change in the same way)
Change in Practice required to achieve the Project’s Vision
Change in KAS required to support this change
Project strategies2 to bring about these changes in KAS and Practice?
Step 1. Write out the names of the two actors between which you want to form or strengthen a relationship
*Step 2. What they will be doing differently as a result of a stronger relationship
Step 3. Changes in knowledge or attitude required to bring about the change in relationship
Step 4. Project strategies, what the project would do

 

 
*Step 2 and 3 are interchangeable.
 
 Click here for a chart linking outcomes, strategies, milestones, and outcome targets.

 

 

 
Click here to see the next step, Developing an M and E plan.

 

www.hit-counter-download.com

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.